New technique could propagate vanilla to meet high demand

It’s one of the world’s two best-loved flavors, and demand for it is increasing all the time but now its future in the global food industry could be more secure, thanks to research at The University of Nottingham’s Malaysia campus.

Vanillin is a compound that comes from the vanilla bean, the ‘fruit’ of the flowering vanilla orchid. The orchid is a tropical, climbing vine originally cultivated by ancient Central American civilizations such as the Aztecs and is now grown worldwide with Madagascar, Indonesia and China by far the biggest producers.

The uniquely scented flavor of vanilla is second only to chocolate in popularity on the world’s palate. It’s also the second most expensive spice after saffron. But highly labor intensive cultivation methods and the plant’s temperamental life cycle and propagation mean production on a global scale is struggling to keep up with the increasing demand for the product.

Scientists in the School of Biosciences on the University’s Malaysia campus are working to create new and robust methods for the cloning of some economic species and some rare species of the orchid through tissue culture. The research is concentrating on the most common cultivated vanilla orchid, Vanilla planifolia, a perennial which
produces the pods from which the natural vanillin is extracted.

Traditionally the vanilla orchid is propagated by stem cuttings but this method is labor intensive, time-consuming and not economical because taking cuttings can cause the retardation of the mother plant and a reduction in yield. Tissue culture or ‘cloning’ of a high quality parent plant from non-reproductive cells offers a viable and simple method for the large scale commercial production of vanilla plants, but the technique has a current flaw which the scientists are hoping to overcome.

Problems arise when variations occur in the sub-clones of one parental line, creating off-types. which are not of the same quality as the parent plant. It can be costly if a high percentage of the micro propagated sub-clones are off-types that have to be scrapped.

The scientists have been awarded a Fundamental Research grant from the Malaysian Ministry of Higher Education to use DNA marker systems to investigate how these mutations occur. Such marker systems have been widely used to detect the genetic similarities and differences in micro-propagated material in various plants and are simple, quick and cost-effective for routine application.

The research is being carried out by Dr. Peter Alderson and Dr. Chin Chiew Foan in the School of Biosciences.

This entry was posted in Costa Rica News. Bookmark the permalink.