GOP leadership in House delays vote on budget bill

The U.S. House of Representatives has delayed a vote on a Republican plan to cut government spending and raise the federal borrowing limit in two stages. With only five days until a potential default on the national debt, drama reached a peak in the House late Thursday, as the Republican speaker of the House, John Boehner, postponed the vote amid reports he did not have enough support among his own Republican caucus to pass it.

The vote on the bill proposed by Boehner was scheduled for early evening, Washington, D.C. time. But after two hours of debate on the bill, instead of voting on it, the Republican-controlled House suddenly turned its attention to bills on re-naming post offices. The House then recessed for several hours, amid reports that Boehner did not have the 217 votes he needed to pass the measure among his 240 Republican caucus members.

Individual Republican lawmakers were seen entering and leaving the speaker’s office, amid speculation Boehner was holding one-on-one-consultations with anti-government Tea Party supporters, who have opposed the bill because they feel it does not cut spending enough.

Emerging from the speaker’s office, Republican Louie Gohmert of Texas told reporters he was still a “bloodied, but beaten NO” vote.

Earlier Thursday, Boehner appeared confident at a news conference.

“Today the House will take action, again, on a solution to end the debt limit crisis. We will take action again, just like we did on our budget, on solutions to the problems that are facing our nation,” he said.

A number of Republican lawmakers took the floor to call for passage of the Boehner “Budget Control” bill, which would cut government spending by a larger amount than it would increase the debt limit. Republican Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan said the $14.3 trillion U.S. debt is not only endangering the future for America’s children, but that all of that borrowed money and the interest paid on it are hurting the U.S. economy right now.

“Half of that money is coming from other other countries like China. Why on earth do we want to give the president a blank check, to keep doing that, giving our sovereignty and our self-determination to other countries to loan us money to fund our government. Those days have got to end,” Ryan said.

Several Republican lawmakers said the bill was not perfect, but that it was a compromise and the best chance to avoid default. House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer and other Democrats strongly disagreed, saying the bill was not bipartisan and not a compromise.

“There is no common ground here, nor was it sought. We find ourselves at an unprecedented place today. Americans stand on the brink of default. It stands there my friends, because the leadership of the House has failed to act in a timely and responsible way,” he said.

Without a deal on some kind of plan to raise the $14.3 trillion legal limit on borrowing by the deadline, the Treasury Department says it will not have enough money to pay all of its bills starting Aug. 2. That could bring a default that would likely prompt rating agencies to cut the U.S. credit rating, bringing higher interest rates and hurting economic growth.

This entry was posted in World News. Bookmark the permalink.