Ray Bradbury dies at 91 and leaves vast legacy

Iconic science fiction and fantasy writer Ray Bradbury died Tuesday in California at the age of 91.

Bradbury, who wrote the classic “Fahrenheit 451,” about a totalitarian future when books are burned, and more than two dozen other novels and 600 short stories, was probably more instrumental than any other 20th century American author in popularizing, and legitimizing, science fiction and fantasy.

Born in a small town in Illinois in 1920, he read popular publications with titles like Weird Tales, Thrilling Wonder Stories and Astounding Science Fiction.

At an early age he resolved that, lacking athletic talents, he would stop competing with his peers and, instead, do what gave him the most pleasure: reading and writing. He was 12 when he set himself the goal of writing at least four hours a day, a practice that stayed with him throughout his lifetime. He published his first story in Weird Tales when he was 20.

Bradbury recalled in an interview that his parents were poor and he never attended college.

“But I had enough sense when I was 18-years old to start going to the library five or six nights a week,” he said. “Every morning I wrote. Every afternoon I sold newspapers on the street corner, and I graduated from the library when I was 28 years old.”

That love of libraries stayed with him throughout his life, and in a 2010 interview with the U.S. State Department he said, “what I think I can teach people is that a library is more important than a college or university.”

At first he wrote short stories, which by his own description were “unconventional tales of ghosts and haunts.”

He was inspired with tales of Mars by the adventure and science fiction writer Edgar Rice Burroughs. But Bradbury’s The “Martian Chronicles,” published in 1950, was a social commentary that dealt with current issues: the threat of nuclear war, racism, pollution, censorship, and out-of-control technology.

His love of books and aversion to censorship were the basis for what became his best known work, “Fahrenheit 451,” a slim 1953 novel about a fireman whose job is to burn books, but who joins an underground group devoted to memorizing the classics in order to preserve them. The book was made into a movie in 1966, starring Julie Christie and Oskar Werner.

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