Jacó businessman deplores his prison conditions

Jailed Jacó businessman Patrick Hundley says conditions in his Pérez Zeledón prison are deplorable, evil and a poor, poor reflection of Costa Rica. He said he hopes President Luis Guillermo Solís can find the strength to make needed changes.

Hundley runs Daystar Properties, a development firm in the Pacific coast community. He is facing an allegation of administrative fraud, meaning that he did not follow through on promises to purchase and develop a property with money given to him by investors.

The project appears to be one that was caught in the 2009 economic downturn and is further clouded by the divorce and death of a previous owner. Five investors claim he took $7 million.

Hundley wrote a letter in which he outlined his situation and hopes for the future. That letter is HERE! The letter was delivered via email by a third party.

Hundley is the owner of the Jacó Rays second division soccer team and a founder and former president of the Central Pacific Chamber of Commerce.

The allegation against him is of the type that usually is resolved with negotiations and perhaps some form of restitution, but the Jacó man notes that he has been in preventative detention for 113 days in overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in the southern zone prison.

By contrast, Luis Milanes Tamayo, accused of

Sign on the prison fence

Sign on the prison fence

fraud by taking $200 million from investors in 2002, has served just a single day in jail while his case drags through the courts in San José.

Hundley, originally form Michigan, correctly notes that many who are held in preventative detention eventually are declared innocent. Predictably, he said the allegation against him is false. But the thrust of the letter is not to discuss his criminal case. Instead, he said “The system is broken and in need of immediate repair.”

In addition to overcrowding, he cites inadequate food, lack of drinking water and unsanitary situations that sometimes lead to violence. He said that Costa Rica should live up to its ideals.

Much of what he says has been said earlier in A.M. Costa Rica by others who have experienced time in prison.

Jailed Jacó businessman Patrick Hundley says conditions in his Pérez Zeledón prison are deplorable, evil and a poor, poor reflection of Costa Rica. He said he hopes President Luis Guillermo Solís can find the strength to make needed changes.

Hundley runs Daystar Properties, a development firm in the Pacific coast community. He is facing an allegation of administrative fraud, meaning that he did not follow through on promises to purchase and develop a property with money given to him by investors.

The project appears to be one that was caught in the 2009 economic downturn and is further clouded by the divorce and death of a previous owner. Five investors claim he took $7 million.

Hundley wrote a letter in which he outlined his situation and hopes for the future. That letter is HERE! The letter was delivered via email by a third party.

Hundley is the owner of the Jacó Rays second division soccer team and a founder and former president of the Central Pacific Chamber of Commerce.

The allegation against him is of the type that usually is resolved with negotiations and perhaps some form of restitution, but the Jacó man notes that he has been in preventative detention for 113 days in overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in the southern zone prison.

By contrast, Luis Milanes Tamayo, accused of

prison sign

A.M. Costa Rica file photo

Sign on the prison fence

fraud by taking $200 million from investors in 2002, has served just a single day in jail while his case drags through the courts in San José.

Hundley, originally form Michigan, correctly notes that many who are held in preventative detention eventually are declared innocent. Predictably, he said the allegation against him is false. But the thrust of the letter is not to discuss his criminal case. Instead, he said “The system is broken and in need of immediate repair.”

In addition to overcrowding, he cites inadequate food, lack of drinking water and unsanitary situations that sometimes lead to violence. He said that Costa Rica should live up to its ideals.

Much of what he says has been said earlier in A.M. Costa Rica by others who have experienced time in prison.

Little summer expected in the next two weeks
By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

With lightning cracking and heavy rains raking the country in the afternoons, many Costa Ricans and expats are yearning for the veranillo de San Juan.

The country’s folklore says that the “little summer of San Juan” will begin its five-day run every June 24, according to the Instituto Meteorológico Nacional.

In fact, Saint John the Baptist maintains a flexible calendar. The weather institute says that the five days without rain, the little summer, can take place any time in the last two weeks of the month.

The condition only affects the Central Valley and the Pacific coast. The words play on the Costa

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