High winds reported beginning to diminish

Winds Tuesday reached 120 kph in the mountains and in parts of the Central Valley, according to the national weather service. The intensity appears to have diminished in the afternoon and evening.

The winds brought diverse problems.

Grupo ICE reported 392 electrical outages caused by the winds. That included the Compañía Nacional de Fuerza y Luz and the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad. A report said that at least eight utility poles had fallen.

Trees also were victims of the unrelenting winds. One tree smashed a car and another did heavy damage to a home.

The weather condition also created rains in the Caribbean mountains, and the rivers there were reported rising late Tuesday. They included the ríos Colorado and Reventazón as well as the Banano. and the Río Sixaola-Telire, according to the Instituto Meteorológico Nacional.

The seas were whipped up by the winds, too, and the Servicio Nacional de Guardacostas based in Flamingo reported tough going as a boat and crew traveled to the Islas Catalina in the Pacific to retrieve a U.S. citizen who had fallen and injured himself.

The Ministerio de Obras Públicas y Transportes asked residents to report any traffic signals that had been damaged while being pushed around by the winds.

The speed of 120 kph is about 75 mph. The winds are expected to continue to diminish for the rest of the week.

A crew of the Servicio Nacional de Guardacostas takes a    52-year-old U.S. citizen identified as Charles Eli Rosenberg for     medical help. The man fell while hiking on Islas Catalina in the     Pacific off Playa Potrero but he was able to use his cell telephone to     call for help.

A crew of the Servicio Nacional de Guardacostas takes a
52-year-old U.S. citizen identified as Charles Eli Rosenberg for
medical help. The man fell while hiking on Islas Catalina in the
Pacific off Playa Potrero but he was able to use his cell telephone to
call for help.

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