Members of U.S. Congress visit Cubans

The U.S. government has shown some interest in the plight of at least  6,000 Cubans who are stuck at the Costa Rica-Nicaraguan border.

An influential member of the U.S. Congress, Kay Granger, a Texas Republican, was in the country Tuesday to get a first-hand look on the situation. She was  accompanied by a Democratic colleague, Henry Cuellar of the 28th District in Texas.

They met with Costa Rican officials in Liberia, but there was no summary of what was said. One news agency said that U.S. officials declined to speak with a reporter.

The United States is faced with more than 30,000 Cubans trying to enter via land borders. Those in Costa Rica are just a fraction of the total.

The United States has shown mixed feelings about the Cuban migration. A 1966 Cold War era law gives Cubans who enter  by land or reach land preferential treatment by U.S. immigration. There have been calls to change the law. That would leave the Cuban migrants stranded.

Ms. Granger is a 10-term member of Congress and, among other achievements, helped set up the Department of Homeland Security. She represents part of the city of Forth Worth and a large tract of county to the west.

Cuellar is a sixth-term congressman and a former Texas secretary of state. “Since coming to

Kay Granger

Kay Granger

Congress, he’s worked hand in hand with Customs and Border Protection, the Department of Homeland Security, Immigrations and Customs Enforcement and local law enforcement to reinforce border security initiatives along the U.S. southern border with Mexico,” his online biography says. His district runs from San Antonio south to the Mexican border.

If the U.S. government has provided any help to the stranded Cubans here, there has been no announcement of the fact. Some individual U.S. expats have provided food and support. Cubans already in the United States usually are anti-Communist due to their experiences on their island home. They also generally vote Republican, which may be why there is no obvious assistance from the Barack Obama administration, which is Democratic.

Meanwhile, the situation for the stranded Cubans continues to be confusing. Costa Rican officials thought they had struck a deal with El Salvador and México Monday, and the plan is to fly Cubans from Costa Rica to El Salvador and then guide them to México by bus.

The deal has yet to be outlined in details, and it has been characterized as a pilot plan.

Generally officials seek to fly out Cubans from Daniel Oduber airport, but there has been suggestions that Cubans will have to pay for the flight and the country’s exit tax. After more than a month stuck in Costa Rica, many of the Cubans are broke.

So is Costa Rica, which has spent in excess of $1 million housing the migrants in 37 public shelters. Other Cubans are stuck in northern Panamá becasue Costa Rica will accept no more.

Once in El Salvador, the Cubans most likely will be asked to pay more money for the bus trip north.

he U.S. government has shown some interest in the plight of at least  6,000 Cubans who are stuck at the Costa Rica-Nicaraguan border.

An influential member of the U.S. Congress, Kay Granger, a Texas Republican, was in the country Tuesday to get a first-hand look on the

situation. She was  accompanied by a Democratic colleague, Henry Cuellar of the 28th District in Texas.

They met with Costa Rican officials in Liberia, but there was no summary of what was said. One news agency said that U.S. officials declined to speak with a reporter.

The United States is faced with more than 30,000 Cubans trying to enter via land borders. Those in Costa Rica are just a fraction of the total.

The United States has shown mixed feelings about the Cuban migration. A 1966 Cold War era law gives Cubans who enter  by land or reach land preferential treatment by U.S. immigration. There have been calls to change the law. That would leave the Cuban migrants stranded.

Ms. Granger is a 10-term member of Congress and, among other achievements, helped set up the Department of Homeland Security. She represents part of the city of Forth Worth and a large tract of county to the west.

Cuellar is a sixth-term congressman and a former Texas secretary of state. “Since coming to

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