We’re from the government here to tell you the truth

Some members of the U.S. Congress want to counter all the tall tales being distributed by the Russians and the Chinese, if any.

They plan to enlist the U.S. State Department, the U. S. Agency for International Development and the Broadcasting Board of Governors, among others.

The idea is to hand out $20 million to those willing to carry the U.S. party line. But the bill, H. R. 5181, insists that the chairman of the Board of Governors shall not compromise the journalistic freedom or integrity of relevant media organizations.

The board runs the Voice of America, which publishes and broadcasts in many languages.

Of course the State Department is being asked to establish a committee and a Center for Information Analysis and Response. Among the goals will be to support local independent media who are best placed to refute foreign disinformation and manipulation in their own communities, it says.

The bill also seeks to distort current programs:

“When selecting participants for United States educational and cultural exchange programs, the secretary of State shall give special consideration to students and community leaders from populations and countries the secretary deems vulnerable to foreign propaganda and disinformation campaigns,” the bill also says.

In addition, the new center seems to be charged with doing basically what the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and other multi-lettered organizations try to do now:

“To analyze tactics, techniques, and procedures of foreign government information warfare with respect to disinformation, misinformation, and propaganda.”

The bill seems to outlines fears that foreign governments are using “disinformation, misinformation, and propaganda to influence the policies and social and political stability of the United States and United States allies and partners.”

The primary sponsors are Adam Kinzinger, an

Illinois Republican, and Ted W. Lieu a California Democrat.

Naturally, the proposal does not go down well with U.S. civil liberties and journalistic observers. One called the bill de facto ministry of truth, citing the literary works of George Orwell.

Until now, U.S. efforts overseas generally dispensed fact and not propaganda. In fact, U.S. officials nearly always were outclassed by their Soviet counterparts. The Voice of America also has a reputation for journalistic integrity, and A.M. Costa Rica publishes some of its daily material gleaning for commercial wire services.

The U.S. had an Office of War Information in World War II, but the propaganda was generally kept overseas in the theaters of war. Basically the agency published magazines and dropped leaflets on the enemy.

As to the new bill, “though putatively aimed to counter purported disinformation abroad, text of the bill hints the effort would operate on some level within the U.S., as well — or at least cracks the door to widening that scope and focus in the future,” said Claire Bernish of the AntiMedia.org in an article.

A quick history of propaganda shows that other forces are far more effective. The Soviet Union collapsed, in part, due to rock and roll songs copied from Scandinavian radio shows and distributed widely. And then there were the singers who were social critics.

The world’s best propagandists work on New York’s Madison Avenue, and they are not mentioned in the bill.spy060916

Some members of the U.S. Congress want to counter all the tall tales being distributed by the Russians and the Chinese, if any.

They plan to enlist the U.S. State Department, the U. S. Agency for International Development and the Broadcasting Board of Governors, among others.

The idea is to hand out $20 million to those willing to carry the U.S. party line. But the bill, H. R. 5181, insists that the chairman of the Board of Governors shall not compromise the journalistic freedom or integrity of relevant media organizations.

The board runs the Voice of America, which publishes and broadcasts in many languages.

Of course the State Department is being asked to establish a committee and a Center for Information Analysis and Response. Among the goals will be to support local independent media who are best placed to refute foreign disinformation and manipulation in their own communities, it says.

The bill also seeks to distort current programs:

“When selecting participants for United States educational and cultural exchange programs, the secretary of State shall give special consideration to students and community leaders from populations and countries the secretary deems vulnerable to foreign propaganda and disinformation campaigns,” the bill also says.

In addition, the new center seems to be charged with doing basically what the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and other multi-lettered organizations try to do now:

“To analyze tactics, techniques, and procedures of foreign government information warfare with respect to disinformation, misinformation, and propaganda.”

The bill seems to outlines fears that foreign governments are using “disinformation, misinformation, and propaganda to influence the policies and social and political stability of the United States and United States allies and partners.”

The primary sponsors are Adam Kinzinger, an

spy v spy

tvtropes.org graphic

Illinois Republican, and Ted W. Lieu a California Democrat.

Naturally, the proposal does not go down well with U.S. civil liberties and journalistic observers. One called the bill de facto ministry of truth, citing the literary works of George Orwell.

Until now, U.S. efforts overseas generally dispensed fact and not propaganda. In fact, U.S. officials nearly always were outclassed by their Soviet counterparts. The Voice of America also has a reputation for journalistic integrity, and A.M. Costa Rica publishes some of its daily material gleaning for commercial wire services.

The U.S. had an Office of War Information in World War II, but the propaganda was generally kept overseas in the theaters of war. Basically the agency published magazines and dropped leaflets on the enemy.

As to the new bill, “though putatively aimed to counter purported disinformation abroad, text of the bill hints the effort would operate on some level within the U.S., as well — or at least cracks the door to widening that scope and focus in the future,” said Claire Bernish of the AntiMedia.org in an article.

A quick history of propaganda shows that other forces are far more effective. The Soviet Union collapsed, in part, due to rock and roll songs copied from Scandinavian radio shows and distributed widely. And then there were the singers who were social critics.

The world’s best propagandists work on New York’s Madison Avenue, and they are not mentione

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